8 Best Drivers under $200: Fairly Priced for an Advanced Player (Spring 2022)

Golfing doesn’t have to be expensive. We review the best drivers available on the market for under $200.
By
reviewed
Reviewed by
Last updatedLast updated: April 15, 2022
Golf Authority is reader-supported. We may earn a commission through products purchased using links on this page. Learn more about our process here

It’s almost that time of year to start thinking about getting out on the golf course – and the perfect time to consider what drivers you are going to use this year. We reviewed a few drivers for you, so you don’t need to spend all your time in the pro shop or researching tons of pages. What we found are the best drivers for under $200. Our price point is right for budget and serious golfers who want to get the most out of their game without spending all their free time money on a single club.

Top 8 Drivers under $200 Reviewed in 2022

?
Consumer Engagement
Chosen by 7589 people in the past 30 days
9.8
Customer Feedback
Customer Feedback
9.6
Brand Reputation
Based onweb analytics
9.6
Features & Benefits
Product Review
9.3
9.8
Features
  • Hand orientation: right
  • Flex: regular
  • Loft: 9.5 degrees
  • Shaft material: graphite
  • Putter lie angle: 59 degrees
  • Length: 44 inches
  • Weight: 215 g

More features: cup face design, super lightweight, 460CC deep face, low center of gravity

Mazel earned our top spot as a driver under $200 because of its weight and ability to be a bit more forgiving with its wide head. The big “sweet spot” certainly helps new golfers and those who need a little help.

The Mazel finds a nice balance of price while maintaining the accurate and straight balls you would expect from a more expensive club. We noticed an increase in range as well, which is an impressive combination considering the price and ease of use. Our testers felt more confident using the Mazel driver – which is important in beginner and amateur golfers.

Mazel’s driver is comparable to our Premium Pick right below. The biggest difference is that the GX-7 comes with a better one-year warranty. We found that the Mazel might be easier to use for new golfers looking to develop the right muscles with a lower weight club.

What makes it stand out?

  • Lightweight, especially nice for new golfers who might swing too fast or slow
  • Outstanding bang for your buck

Which disadvantages must you keep in mind?

  • Some of us didn’t like the sound it makes - not a traditional driver sound
  • Could use a solid warranty
?
Consumer Engagement
Chosen by 8144 people in the past 30 days
9.7
Customer Feedback
Customer Feedback
9.5
Brand Reputation
Based onweb analytics
9.2
Features & Benefits
Product Review
9.6
9.7
2
Premium Pick

GX-7 “X-Metal”

Features
  • Hand orientation: right
  • Flex: regular
  • Loft: 14 degrees
  • Shaft material: graphite
  • Putter lie angle: 58 degrees
  • Length: 45.5 inches
  • Weight: 0.97 lbs.

More features: a custom design for mid to handicap golfers, legal for tournament play, one-year warranty

GX-7 X Metal earned the Premium Pick through its use of lightweight materials, advantages for a slower swing speed, and offering a 1-year warranty for an inexpensive club. Not every budget golf driver offers a warranty!

New golfers and those with a slower swing speed need not worry with the GX-7 X Metal. A lack of speed won’t hold back your drive distance or direction, as the weight and large head still connect well with the ball.

Designed to be hit like an iron, the GX-7 doesn’t require a sudden change in technique when transitioning from one club to the other, giving it a low learning curve.

Compared to our Editor’s pick, the GX-7 is slightly less forgiving but does offer a 1-year warranty, which is perfect for making sure the club stays in good shape long term. The Mazel is about on par with the GX-7 for swing speed needs.

What do we love it for?

  • Considered a good senior driver given its lightweight and appeal to low to midrange golfers
  • We found it is very accurate
  • It can be used in tournaments
  • One year warranty is great in case it breaks

What were we disappointed with?

  • We noticed it doesn’t ‘feel’ solid on the hit, but that’s more subjective
  • For the price, it could be durability issues though the warranty is definitely helpful
?
Consumer Engagement
Chosen by 9478 people in the past 30 days
9.5
Customer Feedback
Customer Feedback
9.0
Brand Reputation
Based onweb analytics
9.4
Features & Benefits
Product Review
9.2
9.5
3
Features
  • Hand orientation: right
  • Flex: regular
  • Loft: 10.5 degrees
  • Shaft material: graphite
  • Putter lie angle: 58 degrees
  • Length: 45 inches
  • Weight: 200 g.

More features: pine meadow standard grip, 460CC clubhead, headcover included, offset anti-slice technology

The Pinemeadow offset is a well-priced graphic driver with a big sweet spot and an offset head that helps golfers drive straighter. The PGX is quite light and weighs just a bit less than our Editor’s Pick.

The price of under $100 readily makes the PGX Pinemeadow the best value, though the left-handed club raises the price significantly – it’s still quite cheap. PGX offers a sharp green and black look with a club tailored to those who need a little help with the swing. The overall rather lightweight helps senior and new golfers gain swing speed without wearing themselves out.

The GX-7 Metal is most comparable with a one-year warranty offered. In the case of Pinemeadow, you still get a warranty for less than half the price. Between a nice-looking offset club and a warranty, the value here is legitimately impressive.

Why is it special?

  • The price is totally right for a new golfer or one on a budget
  • Offset head will help people who have a bit of trouble getting their swing just right
  • Comfortable handle for an inexpensive club
  • Anti slice technology is great for golfers struggling with a straight drive
  • 1-year warranty

What are the flaws?

  • Doesn’t offer much of the “driver feel” some golfers need to feel more confident in their shot
  • Potential questions about the durability of a very low-priced driver are offset by the warranty
?
Consumer Engagement
Chosen by 6657 people in the past 30 days
9.4
Customer Feedback
Customer Feedback
9.1
Brand Reputation
Based onweb analytics
9.1
Features & Benefits
Product Review
9.0
9.4
4
Adjustability King

MACGREGOR Golf MACDRIVER110

Features
  • Hand orientation: right
  • Flex: regular
  • Loft: 12 degrees
  • Shaft material: graphite
  • Putter lie angle: not specified
  • Length: 42 inches
  • Weight: not specified

More features: 460CC titanium head, premium soft compound, ultra-thin face design

In a slight change from previous clubs, the MacGregor MacDriver adds a titanium head. In our tests, the MacGregor grips are a nice touch and make it easy to hold onto this club in full swing without hurting your hands. MacGregor offers a little customization, too. While the first three drivers were locked at a 10-degree loft, MacGregor has a key that allows you to change the pitch between 9, 10.5, and 12 degrees. This is a great addition for more experienced golfers who want to make a choice before stepping into the tee box.

MacGregor offers a bit more customization than our Editor’s pick with the Mazel. You’ll get better grips too. The only issue some golfers might have is the addition of a little bit of weight though it’s not overly heavy by any means.

What stands out?

  • Includes better grips
  • Adjustable pitch is great for learning and experienced golfers. You should read about adjustable fairway woods here, too
  • Titanium head is worth it for the price - feels more solid and sounds nice

What cons did we manage to find?

  • Be sure to inspect the pitch screw before playing to make sure it's where you set it - it could come loose
  • The screw could be easier to access and use through its placement makes sense
?
Consumer Engagement
Chosen by 5173 people in the past 30 days
9.3
Customer Feedback
Customer Feedback
9.0
Brand Reputation
Based onweb analytics
9.2
Features & Benefits
Product Review
8.8
9.3
Features
  • Hand orientation: right
  • Flex: uniflex
  • Loft: 10.5 degrees
  • Shaft material: graphite
  • Putter lie angle: not specified
  • Length: 45 inches
  • Weight: not specified

More features: soft rubber pro-line grip, headcover included

The Bullet Golf B-52 is a good start if you are worried about your slice – which many golfers beginning and amateur alike, are. Bullet offers a bit of a longer shart, which will be more helpful for taller golfers. You also get a nice soft rubber grip to maintain a good hold with or without gloves.

We really enjoyed testing the Bullet Golf. Uniflex works well for us regardless of the flex type we need – which actually makes it easier to choose a golf club to buy – and the right one to use on the course.

Bullets offer the same increase in length as the PDX Pinemeadow and appeal to taller golfers or people with shorter arms, or those who desire higher swing speed. The Bullet, however, lacks a clear and obvious warranty which isn’t a huge burden, but more product confidence could help.

What do we love it for?

  • A sharp, though not over the top attractive design
  • The grips are pleasant to hold, even after 18+ holes
  • Nicely built for taller or people with less reach
  • Potential for higher club speed and distance with length

What were we disappointed with?

  • People who really want more choice in the flex level could be disappointed by the single uniflex
  • No warranty is a bit disappointing compared to others
RELATED: 8 Best Drivers under $300: Affordable Luxury (Spring 2022)
?
Consumer Engagement
Chosen by 6972 people in the past 30 days
9.0
Customer Feedback
Customer Feedback
8.9
Brand Reputation
Based onweb analytics
8.6
Features & Benefits
Product Review
8.6
9.0
6
Features
  • Hand orientation: right
  • Flex: stiff
  • Loft: 10 degrees
  • Shaft material: not specified
  • Putter lie angle: not specified
  • Length: not specified
  • Weight: 310 g

More features: training grip, longer tee shots, improved power

Welcome to the world of practice clubs! 310 literally refers to the 310-gram weight, which is a bit heavy and meant to help you develop swing speed and accuracy. Momentous is meant to strengthen your arms a bit, which can also help you use other drivers and irons better.

Momentous is the first club you should use when starting, when appropriate. The club helps your muscles get ready to swing smaller clubs a bit faster too. The actual purpose? Slow down your first drives and turn you into a more precise golfer who is able to better use clubs that use more control.

The GX-7 is the closest comparison to Momentus 310’s weight and purpose, though they aren’t exactly the same kind of club. The GX-7 is meant for general course usage, while the Momentus is not.

Why did it make our list?

  • Great for long drives and training your arms for speed and precision
  • Good and durable for the purpose of a training club with serious driving abilities
  • Certainly among our best for true beginners. Read more about those specific clubs here

What is not ideal about it?

  • Rather limited purpose, though great for people who need to build muscles
  • Given the weight, some golfers might want to replace the grip
  • Not usable in most tournaments and generally not encouraged in the tee box
?
Consumer Engagement
Chosen by 2348 people in the past 30 days
8.9
Customer Feedback
Customer Feedback
8.8
Brand Reputation
Based onweb analytics
8.7
Features & Benefits
Product Review
8.7
8.9
7
Distance Champion

COOLO Golf Club 460CC Driver

Features
  • Hand orientation: right
  • Flex: regular
  • Loft: 10.5 degrees
  • Shaft material: graphite
  • Putter lie angle: 59 degrees
  • Length: 45 inches
  • Weight: 340 g.

More features: a lower center of gravity

You’ve found a club engineered for ease of swing and speed with the COOLO. The 45″ length offers a greater opportunity for leverage. The COOLO is weighted with a low center of gravity, making it easy to bring down quickly. Coupled with the longer standard shaft, you’ll find yourself driving the ball further. At 340 grams, this also weighs a bit more than even the Momentus.

COOLO earned our distance champion for the above combination. The graphite handle is pretty standard across drivers, but the COOLO’s feels extra solid, even with the extra weight.

The closest comparison so far in our tests has been our trainer champion, the Momentus – the big difference being that the COOLO is usable as something beyond a training club. Also, we aren’t vain, but it does look pretty cool too with matte black, red, white, and the vented design.

Why is it special?

  • More distance capabilities
  • Price is reasonable for what you get
  • Looks sharp

What are the flaws?

  • With the weight and distance, the pitch could be adjustable
  • If this could be considered a downside - we hadn’t heard of COOLO
?
Consumer Engagement
Chosen by 3301 people in the past 30 days
8.8
Customer Feedback
Customer Feedback
8.4
Brand Reputation
Based onweb analytics
8.3
Features & Benefits
Product Review
8.6
8.8
8
Inexpensive Distance

Pinemeadow SPR Driver

Features
  • Hand orientation: right
  • Flex: regular
  • Loft: 10.5 degrees
  • Shaft material: graphite
  • Putter lie angle: not specified
  • Length: not specified
  • Weight: 0.99 lbs.

More features: headcover included, low-torque graphite shaft

Welcome Pinemeadow to our list for the second time! This time, their SPR driver makes it too because of the graphite shaft, which helps make the driver fairly light and fast for the weight.

With only regular flex available, the Pinemeadow provides a good value for people who aren’t overly picky about specs and customization. Instead, the angle clubface allows golfers who need to drive the ball on longer holes to do so without overthinking it.

One of the biggest influences for this particular driver to show up on our list is price. You get a well-weighted club with the potential for a high swing speed at a great price. The Pinemeadow compares best to itself in terms of ability, though you could add the other heavier drivers on this list.

What stands out?

  • Very inexpensive
  • A great way to get the most out of long drives without costing an arm and a leg, literally

What cons did we manage to find?

  • We have questions about the durability potential of a long-shafted, heavy driver at this price. We didn't break it, though! You can read more about durability expectations here
  • Not much flexibility in design - regular flex only

Things to Consider

Want to know a bit more about what goes into golf club design and what factors you should consider when buying one? Our buying guide offers some insight into items like grips, materials, and flex.

Important Features

To improve your game, you need well-made equipment that will help you. And to choose what will suit your skills level and overall needs, it’s essential to understand features that make each driver option unique. Read on to learn more!

Hand orientation

While most people are right-handed, it’s important to note the distinction between right- and left-handed clubs. First, you won’t have to worry about the grips or literally anything but the head of the golf club – so if you wanted to, you could remove the head of a golf club and put it on another to make a same-handed club.

Hand orientation matters because the club itself is angled differently for right and left golfers. The “hosel” that connects the shaft to the head is also different and faces the wrong way, making it far more challenging for an opposite hander to use.

Flex

8 Best Drivers under $200: Fairly Priced for an Advanced Player (Spring 2022)

While you swing your club, the flex determines the amount of movement the shaft itself is allowed to provide. Flex also determines whether or not shots go straight.

What is “flex”? Among the many components of your swing that bring the head of the club to the right place, flex has become pretty important. Flex also impacts the power, accuracy, and distance behind your drive. The reality for flex is that it’s based mostly on your swing. Flex comes in a small variety of Extra Stiff, Stiff, Regular, Senior, and Ladies. Consult with a pro or someone at the golf club shop to determine your actual flex needs.

You’ll notice how our top three golf drivers, like the Mazel and PDX, are all regular flex. For an inexpensive golf club, regular flex is a good starting point because the golfer can figure out from there what makes their swing work without spending more money. You’ll also note that flex is determined by the rice and quality of the golf club. A titanium shafted driver will be stiffer and heavier but also capable of driving the ball further. Less flex in titanium is for more experienced golfers who can readily adjust their shots on the fly.

Loft

8 Best Drivers under $200: Fairly Priced for an Advanced Player (Spring 2022)

How high or low do you want to go? The higher the loft, the sharper the angle produced when you hit the ball. The amount of loft needed depends on the situation, but generally speaking, a golf ball’s distance is longest when the angle drops more slowly, so a higher, even shot is best.

Clubs like the adjustable MacGregor are great clubs for controlling the amount of loft your swing produces. You’ll also see how the GX-7 – one of our top picks, has a relatively high loft. How is loft produced? The angle of the clubface determines loft. A higher angle will go higher and have a more dramatic ascent and descent, which can be useful depending on your swing, the distance needed, and obstacles.

Note that some golfers can carry multiple loft angles for different kinds of shots. A lower loft can be helpful to making the ball skip, while a higher angle and speed can make quite the top. The loft also makes a difference for driving over or under trees.

Shaft material

8 Best Drivers under $200: Fairly Priced for an Advanced Player (Spring 2022)

What were shafts made off before the introduction of graphite and titanium? Steel! Steel adds significant weight to golf clubs – you had to have a bit more strength and endurance to golf a century ago.

The majority of shafts within golf club drivers in the last hundred years are graphite. All of the clubs we presented in our guide are graphite, in part because they are light, very common in drivers, and are generally cheaper. The other option not mentioned within our buying guide is titanium. Titanium is a bit heavier and used more often by professionals and serious amateurs. Why? They aren’t as flexible, and they offer more assistance with aim than distance. Titanium shafts are stiffer than graphite – and are less forgiving. They are also more durable, though few will complain about graphite durability.

Putter lie angle

While the focus of our guide is about drivers, the angle of your putter is also important. The putter lie angle determines how the shaft intersects where the putting head. A typical putter lie angle is 70 degrees, and this determines whether your put rolls left, straight, or right, along with your swing.

Putter lie angles are almost standard, but your swing can impact what angle you want. Trying different putters and seeing how the ball rolls – whether left or right, will help you decide what angle to get. Another option is to get multiple putters’ lie angles depending on the angle and speed of the green.

Length

COOLO, Momentous, and Bullet offered some of the longest shaft lengths on drivers we tested. What is the purpose of a long driver? The ability to sustain a higher swing speed, and in some cases, your arm length.

Putting this simply, the length of the shaft helps determine how fast and far the ball can go. The other factors here are that a shorter person shouldn’t opt for a longer shaft length just to drive the ball faster – there’s only so much the shaft can do. Length also decreases accuracy amongst shorter golfers.

Having the right, disciplined swing and the right length of the shaft for your body is more important than going long.

Weight

Weight impacts your ability to swing the club quickly, though you don’t need to swing your golf driver as fast as humanly possible. Just like length, the weight determines your ability to either swing the club the right way for your body and, in many ways, how quickly you develop the muscles needed to drive the ball further. The COOLO training club helps with this, though for a new golfer, any club on this list, when used enough, can strengthen your arms.

In this area, all the clubs we presented have graphite shafts, which are ideal for non-professional golfers. They offer lower weight amounts and more flexibility. Note that weight is generally not a significant factor when your clubs are in your golf bag – in case you had that thought! Worry more about the weight of the club when you are swinging than when the club is idle.

FAQ

The flex determines how much the shaft moves during the swing. Flex generally refers to the bend you’ll see in the shaft of the club, especially in slow motion. While it’s very difficult to see with the naked eye, flex is a big factor in the accuracy and distance of your shot. The best way to know what amount of flex is best for you is to demo some clubs and talk to a golf club salesperson – they can help you learn more about your swing in general. The clubs above are a good starting point if you don’t want to invest lots of money into different clubs and learn about flex – most are regular or have a flex range.

Much like wearing a glove or a shoe, the right grip size is important. The right grip side determines your overall grip on the club and how comfortable you are handling the club while swinging it at full speed. Grip size measurements come from the end of your middle finger to your wrist when your handle is fully extended. Incorrectly sized grips can result in erratic shots, as your hands will adjust to the incorrect size and cause movement as you swing. Excessive movement is not a good thing for a long, accurate shot. Don’t assume your height and grip size are related either. Actually, measure it!

The easy answer is to clean it. A clean golf club that is free of dirt, debris, and moisture is a happy, healthy golf club that is less likely to rust or weaken. The easiest way to keep the club safe is to always put them away dry and use the often-supplied head covers whenever you aren’t using the clubs. This is also true if you happen to play in the rain or after a wet day. There is a reason why golf courses offer to polish and towels between holes – because your clubs will inevitably get dirty when playing.

Use an absorbent, soft towel. Many golf stores carry fairly small, absorbent towels that fit right in even smaller pockets on your golf bag. They are big enough to completely wrap around the head of the club, and then you can flow it down the rest of the shaft. Another cleaning option is using WD40. WD40 is actually a rust remover – not a lubricant and works perfectly to get built-up dirt, grime – and of course, rust off your favorite clubs.

Our Verdict

Our overall best picks include the Mazel for its lightweight design, low price, and ability to drive for a good distance. PGX will help new golfers get into the game at a low price with a relatively easy-to-learn offset factor. The GX-7 will be popular amongst golfers who desire the best accuracy and are trying to drive down the number of times they end up just short or wide of where they wanted to be on the fairway.

Overall, most of our top picks have the best balance of price, comfort, durability – all with a low learning curve. We know that golfers who are starting and beginning to become more discerning about clubs will be more conscious about how much they are spending while also considering how well their clubs fit their swing. With that, we hope our recommendations lead you to the best driver under $200 of your dreams.

References

1.
Players to Watch at the HSBC Championship
The Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship in the United Arab Emirates, which starts the 2022 European Tour schedule this week, typically attracts a strong field. This year’s tournament is no exception. Among the participants are the former winners Lee Westwood (No. 39 in the world), Tommy Fleetwood (41) and Shane Lowry (48).
2.
In Abu Dhabi, Turning the Desert Into a World-Class Golf Course
What players and fans will see is a course, ranked among the top 50 in the world by Golf Digest, that appears to have been unearthed from the desert sand, but, in fact, was the handiwork of the architect Kyle Phillips. The course was built on land bordering the Persian Gulf, and Phillips worked to make that coastline look like, well, a coastline.
3.
US Women's Open: Juggling a pro golf career when you're a Mom - CNN
Twenty years ago, this is exactly what amateur Brenda Corrie-Kuehn -- eight months pregnant -- did at the US Women's Open at Pine Needles Lodge & Golf Club alongside playing partner Jennifer Greggain, who was well into her second trimester. Their scores were not the best and they were not the quickest around the course -- they were even put on the clock by officials given the number of toilet "pit stop" breaks Corrie-Kuehn had to quite naturally make.
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.